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American Detective Fiction    April 1841-July 1891

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  Published in
The Rural Repository
, Februrary 2, 1850

Janesville [WI] Gazette, August 29, 1850
Wisconsin Democrat, October 12, 1850
The [WI] Sheboygan Mercury, August 17, 1850
Wisconsin Statesman, August 15, 1850
The Elyria [OH] Courier, September 10, 1850

A slightly altered version of this story was published in
Prairie du Chien [WI] Patriot, August 14, 1850

(See the note following the text for an explanation of the revision.)

 


 

 

 

 

“The Female Assassin,” continued from p. 3

becoming confused, and his lips growing stiff. With well-acted concern, the woman rose, and threw her arms around his neck, apparently with the intention of supporting his drooping head.

At this moment, he mechanically raised his hand, and he felt the hammer in the side pocket of the coat worn by the female. He felt conscious of the danger of his situation; he attempted to rise and leave the room, but his strength failed him. He tried to speak, but his tongue was paralyzed. By one desperate effort, he made a faint outcry, and then fell on the floor in a state of utter insensibility.

The woman drew the little hammer from her pocket, and laid it on the floor. She then searched her victim, took his purse, and deposited it in the pocket of the waistcoat she wore. She placed his head in the requisite position to receive the deadly blow, and she raised her right arm for the purpose of inflicting it, when the fatal hammer was suddenly wrested from her grasp. The police agents opportunely entered the room at that moment.

    betrayed affections? The sensibilities of the world, especially of the great world, are often very ridiculous and sometimes very blameable. An effort was made to screen the wretched victim from the punishment of the law. When asked why she committed robbery as well as murder, her defenders could give no satisfactory reply.

On her first examination, she gave the following romantic account of herself. She was of a respectable family and of irreproachable conduct; but having bestowed her affections on a young man who had treacherously forsaken her, she had from that moment vowed implacable hatred to all the male sex; and the murders she had committed were actuated by no other motive than vengeance for the injury inflicted on her feelings.

Would it be believed that there were persons weak enough to pity this unfortunate victim of betrayed affections? The sensibilities of the world, especially of the great world, are often very ridiculous and sometimes very . . .

Continued on p. 5

   
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