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American Detective Fiction    Prior to July 1891

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  Published in
The New York Ledger, September 17, 1870
 
The Stolen Diamond
by Frances Henshaw Haden

By the world!
I think my love be honest, and think she is not;
I think that thou art just, and think thou art not.
I’ll have some proof.               SHAKESPEARE.
  “Annie’s example may do her good. I hope so; she is so very different. Although she is only my adopted child as Lucia is yours, I love her very dearly, and have a thought that some day she will be nearer to me. I know of no one I would so willingly welcome as my son’s wife. I do not know what I should do without her little helping hands. Although there is no necessity for it, she must always be busy about something. And about dress, her ideas are so very modest. She dislikes so much to attract attention. I have often to scold her, to have her appear in a style which her position really demands. You know she has quite a fortune, independent of mine,” said Mrs. Wilton.

“Yes, I’ve heard so. Well, you will have your heart and hand both full this season, in controlling and directing these girls, so entirely opposite to each other.”

“They may do each other good. Annie ought to gain a little appreciation of worldly good, and indeed I wish she did care a little more about dress. Point lace and diamonds afford her . . .

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“Your adopted daughter is very handsome, Ellen. My quiet, demure little Annie will be scarcely seen; indeed, quite eclipsed by the brilliant Lucia.”

“Yes, Lucia is handsome; but—“and Mrs. Davenport hesitated. A sigh escaped her lips, and an anxious expression settled on her face, as she answered her friend’s inquiry:

“What is it that troubles you, Ellen?”

“I will tell you. I ought to; and I feel sure you will lend me your assistance. And with dear, good little Annie’s example, my Lucia may be won from that love of ornament which causes me such uneasiness. Indeed, it was from this hope that I accepted your invitation for Lucia to spend the winter with you.”

   

 

 

 
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