header
American Detective Fiction    Prior to July 1891

menu
Link to homepage Link to browse page Link to search page Link to advanced search page link to contact us page
  Published in
The Gentleman’s Magazine, September (p. 206-210) & October p. (255-261) 1837
 
Leaves from a Life in London — No. III
by William E. Burton
line
The Secret Cell
_____

           I’ll no more—the heart is torn
              By views of woe we cannot heal;
           Long shall I see these things forlorn,
              And oft again their griefs shall feel,
              As each upon the mind shall steal;
           That wan projector’s mystic style.
              That lumpish idiot leering by,
           That peevish idler’s ceaseless wile,
           And that poor maiden’s half-form’d smile,
              While struggling for the full-drawn sigh.
                                                        —Crabbe.

  to be a fiction, is excessively commonplace in some of the details—it is a jumble of real life; a conspiracy, an abduction, anunnery, and a lunatic asylum, are mixed up with constables, hackney-coaches, and an old washerwoman. I regret also that my heroine is not only without a lover, but is absolutely free from the influence of the passion, and is not persecuted on account of her transcendent beauty.

Mrs. Lobenstein was the widow of a German coachman, who had accompanied a noble family from the continent of Europe; and, anticipating a lengthened stay, he had prevailed upon his wife to bring over their only child, a daughter, and settle down in the rooms apportioned to his use, over the stable, in one of the fashionable mews at the west end of London. But Mr. Lobenstein had scarcely embraced his family, ere he was driven off, post haste, to the other world, leaving his destitute relict, with a very young daughter, . . .

line

Find the full text here.

   
print icon

 

 

    About eight years ago, I was the humble means of unraveling a curious piece of villainy that occurred in one of the suburbs of London; it is well worth recording, in exemplification of that portion of “Life” which is constantly passing in the holes and corners of the Great Metropolis. My tale, although romantic enough    

 

 


 

menu
Link to homepage Link to browse page Link to search page Link to advanced search page link to contact us page

All rights reserved. © 2012