header
American Detective Fiction    Prior to July 1891

menu
Link to homepage Link to browse page Link to search page Link to advanced search page link to contact us page
  Published in
The Brooklyn Eagle, January 29, 1864

This story was originally published in England in Experiences of a Real Detective by Inspector F.
Edited by “Walters,” author of Recollections of a Police Officer, Leonard Harlowe, etc.
London: Ward, Lock, & Tyler, 1862. 1-16.

 
The Robbery at Osborne’s Hotel
by Inspector F.

  done nothing more than point and nib it.

The only indication I shall give of my individuality is contained in the following few lines. Several months previous to the organization, in 1829, by Sir Robert, then Mr. Peel, Secretary for the Home Department I had made myself conspicuous to a certain degree in the neighborhood of Covent-garden as an amateur, supplementary sort of constable, and in several instances wherein the Charleys were completely nonplussed, succeeded in bringing criminals to justice. This seemed to be my natural vocation; and when the new police force was in process of definitive formation, I received a communication from Colonel Rowan, proposing to appoint me inspector, if such a post were worth my acceptance. I instantly closed with the offer, disposed of my business—not a very profitable one (I had attended more to the affairs of the public than to my own, and entered with alacrity upon attended more to the affairs of the public than to my own, and entered with alacrity upon the duties of my . . .

line

Find the full text here.

   


 

 

 

 

    “DETECTIVE” literature, if it may be so called, appears to have acquired a wide popularity, chiefly, I suppose, because the stories are believed to be, in the main, faithfully-told, truthful narratives. I have read them all, and need hardly say have discovered mistakes which proved to me that the best and most popular of them were the handiwork of a literary man, not the result of an actual experience. I have frequently made remarks in this sense to my friends, several of whom thereupon suggested that I should publish my own real experiences. I do not know that I should have yielded to the suggestion, had I not a few months since made acquaintance with a gentleman who writes for the best of the London periodicals. He warmly urged me to pitch together the incidents retained in my memory with the memoranda thickly scribbled in my note-book, promising on his part to see the product carefully through the press. I agreed to do so and this series of tales is the result. Tales, certainly, but tales of truth. It is I who have furnished the pen which jots down these recollections; my literary friend having
   

 

 

 
menu
Link to homepage Link to browse page Link to search page Link to advanced search page link to contact us page

All rights reserved. © 2012