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American Detective Fiction    Prior to July 1891

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  Published in
The Schenectady [NY] Reflector, February 25, 1859
The Fox Lake [WI] Gazette, May 12, 1859
The Union Democrat [Manchester, NH], May 31 1859
 
From the Family Journal
The Porcelain Button

by an Ex Detective

  and since then no one could persuade her to have anything to do with any bank. It is supposed that this hoarding propensity was known only to the niece, Miss Milwood, and the servant girl, Hannah.

One morning in September, 1836, the inhabitants of Grand Street were electrified by the report that Mrs. Weldon had been discovered dead in her bed, and that strong proof of guilt existed against her niece, Miss Milwood.

I read the account in the newspapers and supposed it was one of those plain cases which admit no doubt. The matter having occurred in Williamsburg, it was out of my beat, and I thought no more about it.

The following morning while at breakfast, my servant girl informed me that a gentleman wanted to see me. I told the girl to show him up, my time was precious, and I would converse with him while at breakfast.

Almost immediately afterwards a young . . .

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Find the full text here.

   


 


 

 

    Many of our readers will doubtless remember the mysterious murder committed in Grand Street, Williamsburg, in the year 1836. The facts are simply thus:

Mrs. Weldon, an old inhabitant of Williamsburg, lived in a small frame house at the further end of Grand Street, at that time very sparsely built up. A niece and a servant girl were the only persons residing with her. The former appeared very much attached to her aunt, and attended to her wants with filial assiduity. The domestic had lived with Mrs. Weldon for 5 years and was considered a good servant.

Mrs. Weldon was a widow lady, of ample means, in the shape of an annuity, which was paid to her quarterly, but which was to cease with her death. She was rather miserly in her disposition, and accustomed to hoard up money. Her husband at one time had lost a considerable amount by the breaking of a bank,

   

 

 

 
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