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American Detective Fiction    Prior to July 1891

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  Published in
The New York Ledger, March 13, 1869
 
The Judge’s Daughter
by Amy Randolph
  “A strong arm, sir, and a brave, true heart, together with, I hope at least an average amount of brains.”

“Very good stock in trade, very good stock n trade,” answered the Judge, still regarding Mr. Kearney with the little hard glistening beads of eyes. “Aha, Mr. Carleton, is that you?  Walk in and sit down. I’ll be disengaged presently.”

“Then you will give my cause a favorable consideration, Judge,” said Hugh, rising to depart.

“I will, sir.”

And Hugh went out—a tall, handsome fellow, with pleasant dark eyes, and a firm, squarely-cut chin, which betokens no ordinary amount of resolution and will.

Mr. Kent Carleton sat in the office, uneasily turning over the large russet-bound volumes of Blackstone and Cowen, when the Judge deliberately turned himself round in his . . .

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“So you really think you’re in love with my little girl, eh?” said Judge Pelham.

He had a queer brown face, this old man, all ploughed and traversed with a fine network of wrinkles, and little black eyes, with a scanty allowance of lashes, that looked at you like hard, glistening beads. Not the sort of man to confide a love-tale to, nor to sympathize with the first tender outpourings of the heart-masculine; and how Judge Pelham ever came to be the father of a glorious girl like Kate, with the beauty of Hebe, and the winsome, poetic nature of Sappho, was a riddle that we leave to those learned in physiology and psychology.

“Yes, sir,” said Hugh Kearney, bravely, “I am in love with her, and if I am fortunate enough to gain your permission to pay her my addresses—”

“Stop! stop!” said the old gentleman. “Not so fast. One thing at a time, young sir. What have you got?”

   

 

 

 
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