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American Detective Fiction    Prior to July 1891

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  Published in
The New York Ledger, November 20, 1869.
 
Eloise
by Caroline Conrad
  shall never see mamma any more—my poor, suffering, abused mamma!”

“I wish I had it not to tell thee,” Madame said sadly.

“Is she dead?” the child asked.

“Yes, dear.”

Madame bent presently to look on the little girl’s face.

“Don’t, child—don’t look like that!” Madame pleaded, shuddering. “Cry, Eloise—cry here on my bosom; it will do thee good.”

Eloise lifted her great solemn eyes to Madame’s.

He has done it, I know; I know he has,” she said, in strange, unchildlike tones. “Mamma said I should not be sent away from her; she would teach me herself. She said it would . . .

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“Miss Eloise, please, Madame requests to see you in her sitting room.”

A little girl, with black ringletted hair clustering about a fair open face, rather sad but sweet in expression, rose at once from her place in the class, at Madame Renier’s boarding school, and followed the servant from the room.

Madame met her at the door, saying, in a voice of strange compassion:

“My poor darling!”

Eloise’s dark eyes flashed pained inquiry in Madame’s solemn face.

“You have news,” she cried, in a stricken voice—”you have news of mamma! Oh, Madame, tell me!”

“Poor baby! poor little one! how can I tell thee?” Madame murmured.

“Don’t tell me that!” she cried; “don’t tell me I

   

 

 

 
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