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American Detective Fiction    Prior to July 1891

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  Published in
The New York Ledger, March 6, 1857.
 
An Adventure in Paris
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by Sylvanus Cobb, Jr.
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  startling that I have deemed it worthy of print. The first page of the document was devoted to an account of his passage from England to France, and having informed me of his safe arrival in Paris he proceeds:

“As soon as I reached the city I made my way to the Hotel de Princes, where I hoped to find some Americans who had been stopping there; but I was disappointed. They had left the day before, and I was the only American in the house; but I knew there were plenty of my countrymen at other places, and I resolved to hunt them upon the next day, and change my quarters. It was too late now to think of moving that day, and as I was I was a perfect stranger, and cared not to trust strangers, I concluded to remain in doors for the night, and employ my time in writing.

Accordingly I went to my room and arranged my escritoire, and sat down to my work. I had written an hour when someone rapped upon my door, and as I supposed it must be some servant or attaché of the hotel, I simply said ‘Come in,’ and upon this a boy entered, . . .

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    It had been arranged between George Barton and myself that we would visit Europe together; but when the time came a matter of important business kept me at home. George offered to wait until I could go, but as I knew that he had friends in Italy whom he was anxious to see, I urged him to I go, and he finally concluded to do so. But before he went I obtained from him a promise that he would write to me as often as he could, and be sure to give me a faithful account of all his adventures. I accompanied him to Boston, and saw him safely off in one of the Cunard steamers for Liverpool.

In due time I received a letter from my friend. He had reached London in safety. Six weeks were spent in England, and though his letters were interesting enough to me, yet they contained little calculated to interest others, At length I received a package from him, containing a letter occupying ten pages of closely written foolscap, and four newspapers. The letter was dated at Paris, and gave the particulars of an adventure so strange and

   

 

 


 

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